Archive for the 'Rails' Category

E-TextEditor V1.0 Released

E-TextEditor, the Windows text-editor inspired by and based upon the bundles for TextMate has come out of beta.

If you haven’t tried it you should give it a whirl. It is definitely the closest us, aesthetically challenged, yesterday’s news Windows users are going to get to the lofty heights of TextMate.

UPDATE: I notice the Powershell tag is pulling a fair few people into this post from Technorati but only a small proportion of visitors are actually clicking through and checking ‘E’ out. If you are searching for a Powershell editor dear reader give it a look. I think this could be the Powershell editor that people have been waiting for. Whilst there isn’t, to my knowledge at least, a Powershell bundle, there will certainly be a demand for one as this editor takes off. As the bundles are coming currently from the Mac world there obviously has been nobody interested in writing Powershell stuff on the Mac. With ‘E’ this will change and the ‘bundle’ set up is very extensible/flexible. Give it a whirl…

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Deploying Web Apps with Powershell

During my recent forays into the world of Rails I have discovered, as do most people working with Rails, the deployment tool Capistrano. For those of you unfamiliar with it, in a nutshell you end up with a simple command that deploys your application either afresh or as an update including all the database stuff etc. Very nifty (or at least it looks like it is as, being a bit of a newcomer to the leafy green world of Linux, I had a few issues but that was me not Capistrano).

In use, you check your source into Subversion and then Capistrano instructs your server to check it out onto the server and organise it all. So the code only gets onto the server when the server ASKS for it rather than when someone puts it there. This is good… Capistrano communicates via SSH and so this is all the server has to listen for. All is well…

Of course, deploying an ASP.NET app is different in that it isn’t necessarily the source that you want to deploy but the binaries. What I hadn’t considered before is to put the builds into source control as well as the source. This then allows you a central repository for the latest build that your servers can draw down from giving you the Capistrano like experience (to a point). What is missing is the SSH-esque bit.

Enter Windows PowerShell. I won’t go on as you can get a good idea of the possibilities by watching Scott Hanselman discuss Corillian’s deployment set up which is extremely impressive I might add.

While I’m about it Scott mentioned that he was after a good PowerShell editor and we had discussed the possibility of a bundle for e-texteditor although I think maybe this fell out of favour a bit as e-texteditor was quite flakey at the time. It is still in beta but much more stable now so that might be something for a budding PowerShell programmer to look into. Also, I just noticed that the new beta of PrimalScript has PowerShell support although I haven’t tried it.

Adding “Open with Console” to the context menu…

The other day I discovered that if you hold down the ‘shift’ key whilst right clicking on a directory in the Vista explorer you get a ‘Open Command Window Here’ entry in your context menu. You can do this on XP with a PowerToy or some registry jiggery-pokery but it was nice to have it out of the box in Vista.

Having picked up on the excellent ‘Console‘ from Ben’s post the other day I was back to having to ‘cd’ into directories again so set about rummaging in the registry. So… the fruits of my labours:

Add the key – HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\open_console

Set the value of that to whatever you want to appear in the context menu e.g. Open Console Here

Under that add the key HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\open_console\Command

Set the value of that to the path to your console.exe with the parameters -d %1 In my case that gave me C:\Program Files\Console 2 Beta\Console2\console.exe -d %1

There you go… You should now have the context menu entry. Right click on a directory and open Console on that directory. Coupled with e – texteditor’s “Open as e Project’ you can have your rails set up running in a jiffy.

I would like to add the ability to open a few tabs in Console from the context menu with the same command and maybe start a server running in one and have another ready for commands but I can’t seem to get that going at the moment as I’m no great shakes in the registry. If anyone could point me in the right direction for that I’d be most obliged… In fact, it would be nice to open the ‘e’ project and the Console tabs avec server etc with the one context menu command, perhaps ‘Open Rails Environment’ but maybe I’m getting carried away there…

Windows Rails Environment

I have been aware for some time that TextMate is the defacto standard editor for Rails folk but have also been aware that there isn’t really a Windows equivalent. As I don’t have a Mac this has been an issue. I have tried loads of editors and all have their good and bad points but I have yet to see anything close to the stuff I have seen done with TextMate.

Yesterday, Dave Verwer posted a Windows alternative on the GeekUp mailing list. I dutifully downloaded it as I always follow Dave’s advice to the letter 😉 . Bugger me with the wide end of a rag man’s trumpet if it wasn’t exactly what I was after. The editor in question is ‘e’ which you can get for a snip ($35) at  http://www.e-texteditor.com/

It supports TextMate bundles, has a built in file explorer that can be set to project folders and other goodness and can even be set to have a black background which was the clincher for me.

This morning on my daily peruse of the blogging world I stumbled upon a new post on http://softiesonrails.com which in turn led me to an excellent post by Ben Kitrell which outlines the steps to achieving an all singing all dancing Rails environment on Windows. Nice one Ben… I’ve still got a few bits to add but that sounds the business.

Note to Reader: I have deliberately avoided phrases like ‘Mac-esque’ and the like. Those sanctimonious f’ers are smug enough without giving them further encouragement.